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Wait, What? Ep. 84: Q and A DNA Q

Jeff Lester

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First off, our new graphic is courtesy of the incredibly talented Adam P. Knave (who on top of all the other things he does and does well, has added podcaster to the mix. Go check out The Glory, The Glory, why don’t you?) and our old dashed-off scattershot introductions to the podcast, courtesy of me who has once again managed to land himself behind a scheduling eightball.

But!  That doesn’t mean we didn’t attend to our duties, as far as answering your questions go.  On the contrary, Episode 84 of Wait, What? is our first hour and forty five minute foray into the savage wilds of your inquiries.  Among the ground covered by Graeme McMillan and me:  our recommendations for DC Showcases and Marvel Essentials (both real and imaginary), the fall of Vertigo’s Sincere Age, Alan Moore and the plight of 1963, our Free Comic Book Day picks, the damning influence of Big Question Mark, event comics, follow-ups to articles discussed without being read, work for hire vs. creative owned work, Steve Gerber and Foolkiller, Submarine, Elite Squad, our favorite comic book city,  and assorted cage matches and Hunger Games.

Also: Stuff.  Additionally: Things.

Men and Women With X-Ray Eyes (And/Or Specs) have already seen the podcast radiating in the iTunes spectrum (grappling perhaps with an Infrared Manta).  Those of us with only stereoscopic or lesser degrees of vision can certainly be satisfied with the auditory equivalent, as available below:

Wait, What?, Episode 84: Q and A DNA Q

As always, thanks for listening and we hope you enjoy!

34 Responses to “ Wait, What? Ep. 84: Q and A DNA Q ”

  1. To Mr. Lester:

    I DISAGREE! LETS FIGHT ABOUT IT!
    Ok, maybe not that dramatically, but yeah. Your comments about Brandon Graham doing Prophet as a work-for-hire struck me as really odd.

    The creator-owned argument, at least from my perspective, hasnt never really been aspects of a character that have been added by freelancers later (say Hickman on Fantastic Four) but about the creation of the character outright (Kirby and Fantastic Four).
    In the case of Prophet, its creator (the Rob) managed to retain the rights to the character and have freelancers work on it. If things had worked out like that for Kirby we’d all be overjoyed.
    Its not like we’re angry at Mignola for having guys come on to work on his IP. Or Kirkman for Invincible spin-offs.
    Although, taking a step back, its hard to say the Rob has as much creative input as Mignola or Kirkman on the use of their IP, but still.

  2. Big Question Mark is about Graeme always asking questions for his Newarama headline because I found it hilarious that people went to so crazy over it. It is also a play on the phrase “Big Tobacco.”

    Anyway, I love your Q&A podcosts because you guys always go on these weird and amazing tangents so you shouldn’t feel bad about taking forever to get to all of the questions and trying to rush through everything.

    Your Before Watchmen cage match and Marvel Hunger Games are probably the best thing to come from the podcast ever. I’m not sure it’s going to get much better than that.

    Also, two questions for Jeff that he can answers here in the comments or podcast, whatever works best.

    1)Do you have to have read and enjoyed Jack Kirby to fully appreciate American Barbarian? I thought parts of AM were pretty great(Two Tank Omen exploding out the dinosaur was fucking awesome) but thought it was kind of meh overall but I’ve never read any Kirby so I think I might be missing something because of that.

    2)Out of curiosity, why the hate for Steve Niles? Do you just think all of this comics are shit or has he said something stupid on the internet or wherever that made you hate him?

  3. Dave Clarke: Agreed. We are not angry at Mignola or Kirkman–or even the Rob, really–for having others work on their IP.

    But–and this is crucial–it still should be distinguished from creator owned work done by a creator. Although I don’t know the history very well at all, it doesn’t seem like Bill Finger got a better shake just because Bob Kane negotiated a good deal on Batman.

    It is great that creators own their own work, and that Image has done a tremendous job introducing so many writers and artists into the comics field. But seeing as the original Image founders have dabbled in varying degrees of using work for hire to maintain or develop their IP, I think their chest-beating regarding creative rights shouldn’t just be accepted blindly.

    And although they are, of course, in no way obligated to do so, I would hope Mignola, Kirkman, the Image guys and others who use work for hire would at least look to ways to change the marketplace for freelancers, instead of perpetuating the system with one hand and cutting a big check for The Hero Initiative with the others.

    Finally, I think Brandon Graham has done an amazing job advocating and promoting for alternatives to mindless obeisance to the Big Two. But I find it troubling if one of his alternatives is engaging in handshake WFH without the benefit of even a contract. Again, I think it should be something to weigh when he makes statements about the industry.

  4. I haven’t listened to the full podcast yet, but that PROPHET thing? Man, I see a COMPLETELY different property with the PROPHET name than I remember seeing from Liefeld, so I’m kinda disappointed that it is done as any kind of work-for-hire. It isn’t Hickman adding to the Fantastic Four mythos, but a full-on reimagining that just happens to reuse a name.

  5. [Hibbs, Editing, here -- these posts got caught in the spam filter because of the number of hotlinks. More than one always puts your words in there, I find]

  6. You said in the last podcast that you wanted questions! That’s why I posted in the comment thread. (Though I’d had the first one in my mind for a while.)

    My questions have nothing on your bizarre hunger games fanfiction, but I love that my question about Essentials and Showcases turned into a discussion about Vertigo’s eras.

    Steve Bisette on 1963: http://srbissette.com/?p=8694
    “I fully own the copyrights and trademarks to the Fury, N-Man and the Hypernaut, and all related characters, concepts and names, including the anthology title Tales of the Uncanny.”

    A Tales of the Uncanny anthology (featuring work from people associated with the Centre for Cartoon Studies) has supposed to be coming out for years (a preview was released in 2010). It was going to be published by About Comics, but since they went to print on demand that’s not going to happen. It’s supposed to be published by “someone else”, but who knows.

    The other characters/titles are presumably owned by Veitch and Moore, though it seems unlikely that they’d do anything with them.

    Since I asked my original questions I’ve learned a couple of things (though who knows how true they are).

    Apparently the reason 1963 wasn’t published is because Moore had veto power over the book from the original contract. Dynamite was going to publish a collection of the first six issues (and even commissioned a cover from Alex Ross), but it didn’t happen. (http://srbissette.com/?p=14121)

    However if Gibbons and Moore got the rights back, Gibbons would apparently be perfectly free to have whoever he wanted (including DC) publish Watchmen, as long as he paid Moore his share of the profit. I really have no idea. Someone who actually knew copyright law would actually have to say. Though I find it interesting how everyone seems to ignore Gibbons’ opinions on the whole thing.

    Hibbs would know better than me, but Stephenson claims that Saga was returnable.

    http://www.bleedingcool.com/2012/03/30/the-bleeding-i-talking-with-eric-stephenson-about-image-selling-out/

    “Since the beginning of this year, retailers have been able to order the first three issues of a variety of our 2012 books and qualify for full returnability. We did that with Fatale, we did that with Saga, Thief of Thieves, Manhattan Projects…”

    Essential Black Panther is coming out soon collecting Jungle Action #6-22 and #24, and Black Panther #1-10 (is that a strange cut off point?). I’m interested in picking it up since you (and others) have talked about the Jungle Action stuff enthusiastically.

    Your disconnect with New York (“Water towers are real?!”) is similar to what I felt when I lived in Korea and travelled through other parts of Asia. “Those trucks look just like the ones from Akira!” “Look at that temple!”.

    My comments are too long!

  7. AAAAAhhh, your comment system appears to have eaten my comment. Boo.

    You said in the last podcast that you wanted questions! That’s why I posted in the comment thread. (Though I’d had the first one in my mind for a while.)

    My questions have nothing on your bizarre hunger games fanfiction, but I love that my question about Essentials and Showcases turned into a discussion about Vertigo’s eras.

    Steve Bisette on 1963: http://srbissette.com/?p=8694
    “I fully own the copyrights and trademarks to the Fury, N-Man and the Hypernaut, and all related characters, concepts and names, including the anthology title Tales of the Uncanny.”

    A Tales of the Uncanny anthology (featuring work from people associated with the Centre for Cartoon Studies) has supposed to be coming out for years (a preview was released in 2010). It was going to be published by About Comics, but since they went to print on demand that’s not going to happen. It’s supposed to be published by “someone else”, but who knows.

    The other characters/titles are presumably owned by Veitch and Moore, though they’re unlikely to do anything with them.

    Since I asked those questions I’ve learned some things (though who knows how true they are).

    Apparently the reason 1963 wasn’t published is because Moore had veto power over the book from the original contract.

    Dynamite were going to publish a collection of the six issues (going so far as to comission an Alex Ross cover), but it didn’t happen. (http://srbissette.com/?p=14121)

    However if Gibbons and Moore got the rights back, Gibbons would apparently be perfectly free to have whoever he wanted (including DC) publish Watchmen, as long as he paid Moore his share of the profit. I really don’t know about copyright law though, so I can’t say. I find it interesting how nobody really seems to care about Gibbons’ opinion though.

    Hibbs would know better than me, but Stephenson claims that Saga was returnable.

    http://www.bleedingcool.com/2012/03/30/the-bleeding-i-talking-with-eric-stephenson-about-image-selling-out/

    “Since the beginning of this year, retailers have been able to order the first three issues of a variety of our 2012 books and qualify for full returnability. We did that with Fatale, we did that with Saga, Thief of Thieves, Manhattan Projects…”

    Essential Black Panther is coming out soon collecting Jungel Action #6-22 and #24, and Black Panther #1-10 (is that a weird cutoff point?. I’m thinking about getting it since you, and others, have talked about it so enthusiastically.

    Your disconnect with New York (“Water towers are real?!”) is similar to what I felt when I lived in Korea and travelled through other parts of Asia. “Those trucks look just like the ones from Akira!” “Look at that temple!”.

    My comments are too long.

  8. Matthew beat me to the answer about 1963, glad I didn’t go around and gather up all the relevant links and quotes before checking the comments. The TALES OF THE UNCANNY preview book was really entertaining (the Hypernaut pin-up from it has been one of my main desktop wallpapers since it came out), I hope Bissette manages to get it out this year as planned.

    I’ve never heard any suggestion that the 1963 issue led to the Moore/Bissette rift. I suppose it’s possible, since all we really know is that something Bissette said in his Comics Journal interview led to the rift, and Bissette did talk about 1963 in that

    I don’t know what Graham’s deal is with his work for Extreme, but I’m pretty sure that if he hasn’t signed a contract and isn’t an employee than it can’t be work-for-hire under current law by definition. I suppose they can have a verbal agreement to treat it the same as a work-for-hire, but that only works as long as they get along, once they disagree that goes out the window.

  9. As I understand it, Moore and Bissette’s rift has something to do with From Hell’s serialization in Taboo, although Bissette himself is unsure what it is, exactly, that he had said that incensed Moore so.

    Given Bissette’s Norman Podhoretz-level of ex-friends, I doubt it was any one thing,

  10. The Foolkiller mini is worth seeking out. It’s not Void Indigo “ugly”, being a code-approved book with a totally gratuitous and completely irrelevant Spidey cameo in mid-series. But it is Gerber doing his signature urban realism downer stuff; basically his piss-take of the Punisher, taking that character’s absurd premise to its ultimate absurd conclusion. It’s a Vertigo book disguised as a Marvel Comic, and as is typical with a lot of Gerber’s stuff, it probably resonates more in today’s Occupy Wall Street world than it did in 1990.

    The big problem with the series is that it goes through 3 or 4 different artists, all fairly pedestrian stuff. I don’t remember if Shooter was still editor-in-chief by then, but it fits well with his efforts during his tenure to make Marvel as visually un-dynamic as possible.

    Aside to j. smitty: thanks for the Mindless Ones/Mad Men tip! There’s just not enough hours in the day, you know?

  11. Would Prophet have the buzz it did/does if it were an original series instead? A bit of a bummer to think its future always rests on the whims of its original creator, when another creator has turned the concept into something that feels unique and strangely compelling.

    Also while thinking of it, Jeff, your discussion of Prophet last podcast sounded like you were confused. I think if you revisited the ending of #23 (as I was forced to do) and what goes on when Prophet reaches the satellite, it makes more sense, even giving a hint at the bigger story.

  12. Here’s the thing about Prophet – or any comic book, really. When we talk about “creator’s rights,” we all too often talk about them solely in terms of intellectual property rights – who’s going to make money off the trades and the reprints, who gets a chunk of the movie money, etc. And that’s because under our system it’s just assumed that the only fair way to compensate artists is to treat their ideas as commodities – to turn them into property and buy and sell them as such. The more lucrative the property, however, the less incentive artists actually have to be artists, and the more incentive they have to become managers and bosses of other artists, who then work on that “intellectual property” without ever owning any of their own.

    So we have Prophet, a “creator-owned” title. But the “creator” in question isn’t Brandon Graham or Simon Roy or Farel Dalrymple, who actually do all the work on that title. The “creator” is Rob Liefeld, who gets to own the property that is Prophet by dint of the fact that he created a very different character called “Prophet” many years ago. And so we have a curious situation where instead of being exploited by a company, these work-for-hire artists are being exploited by a company and a fellow artist.

    Now, I’m not saying that any of these people are being treated as shittily as they would if they were working for Marvel. But they’re certainly not going to be rewarded as well as if they actually owned the property they’re currently working on. Brandon Graham’s rewards (real and potential) for working on Prophet are very clearly different (and almost certainly lesser) than they are working on King City, and that has to do with fundamental aspects of not just the comic book industry, but our economic and political system itself.

    A just and sane system wouldn’t force artists to either become the wage slaves of corporations or to become the overseers of other wage slave artists. A just and sane system would have just paid Jack Kirby and Jerry Siegel and everyone else in the world a fucking living wage for their work, to say nothing of decent health care and child care and retirement pay and whatever else a humane and decent society might provide.

    Since it’s May Day – or it was yesterday, anyway – I’m just gonna go full-on commie with this one and say it: the only ones who should “own” the rights to a comic book, or any piece of art, or any product for that matter, are the workers who do the actual work of making it. If Rob Liefeld, or Joe Quesada, or the CEOs of Time Warner and Disney, or anyone else wants to make money off comics, they can pick up a pen and a pencil and start drawing. Cartoonists of all nations, unite!

  13. @Eric Rupe: Since I probably won’t have enough wherewithal to remember to answer these very good questions on the ‘cast, lemme take a second and do them here:

    (1) I think Scioli was probably hoping you would find American Barbarian totally awesome on its own, without having to be a huge Kirby fan. That said, from what I remember of Scioli’s afterword in an early issue of The Myth of 8-Opus, he very much takes inspiration from late ’70s Kirby (that Devil Dinosaur influence is pretty easy to see in AB) and later. So the more familiar with Kirby you are–and knowing that he did a lot of the design work in Thundarr The Barbarian–the more you’ll enjoy American Barbarian. (Witness the very funny Ookla/Chewbacca/Gali-Leo gag.)

    But…I’d also argue that being alive and consuming American culture around 1976 will probably make you enjoy AB just as much, if not more. It seems to me Scioli worked really hard to embed references to that area all throughout the book.

    Anyway–sorry it was meh! for you. I ran hot and cold on it too, but the parts I liked I pretty much ADORED.

  14. (2) Ah, Steve Niles. First, the mealymouthed caveat: I don’t really hate Steve Niles, and I apologize if it came across like I *hate* the guy. I really don’t.

    However…

    I totally will ‘fess up to having a degree of frustration and impatience with Niles and his work. Initially coming across him (as a lot of people did), when his first 30 Days of Night series was coming out, he seemed to be exactly what I thought the industry needed: a horror writer who really knew horror (Niles had previously adapted some The Legend of Hell House and I Am Legend, I discovered) and could, essentially, become the Stephen King of the comics industry. As a comic fan and an old school horror fan, I was really excited by that prospect because I felt so much horror in the comics field barely moved beyond the surface of “I read EC Comics *and* I totally used to watch Night Gallery!”

    So those were my hopes by, say, issue #3 or so of 30 Days of Night. By the end of that miniseries, those dreams were pretty dented. By the second issue of his next series (can’t remember if it was Cal McDonald or not), they were pretty much trashed. Much more often than not, I find Niles’ work to be simple, self-satisfied and dull–and that’s whether he’s doing horror or some of the hero/horror hybrid stuff he’s done for DC–and in doing so uses up a certain amount of good will and resources for an area of the marketplace I could be really excited by and (it could be argued) has blocked or retarded development in the marketplace.

    I think that disappointment has led me to be more susceptible to some of the stories floating about sub-rosa about bad behavior on his part but honestly, I’m not in a position to know if those stories are true and, really, they really don’t matter. I don’t think I did more than allude to them in the podcast but even that was too much and I apologize for that.

    And it turns out Kirkman on Walking Dead ended up being the Stephen King of the comics industry, doing much of the stuff I’d hoped we’d see from Niles….so I actually got what I wanted in the end and horror comics still seem retarded and blocked for the most part, so there you go.

  15. REM was a great band but I think you actually had to start listening to them as a college student in the 1980s to really appreciate them. It was just that combination of being young, with being young in that time and place (ideally some undemanding state university somewhere. Just from going through their back catalogue for the first time now has really driven home that I’m 41 now, not 20.

    The same for The Clash, in a way. You really have to be British to get them. I don’t, even though I’ve lived over here for a long time.

  16. One question: Why isn’t there a comixology-like app for small press/self published/underground/mini comics?

    A digital store for all the great stuff that everybody wants to read but can’t get their hands on and is hard to distribute because of the low sales. It wouldn’t hurt the local comic shop, because they don’t sell these kinda comics anyway for the most part. I live in Germany and it is no problem at all to get all the comics listed in Previews. Easy. But tryin’ to get something from Benjamin Marra, Michael Deforge – you name ‘em – impossible! All these gems you see on the photos from Mocca and SPX and whatnot… I can’t buy ‘em here! And I’d like to think I’m not the only one!

    So here’s my proposal: Someone builds an app like comixology for self-published stuff and becomes the defacto distributor for all things digital concerning mini comics and small press stuff. You know what I mean…
    It won’t be a money makin’ machine I guess, but it shouldn’t be anyway. Make it an open plattform for anybody who wants to submit his/her stuff.

    Make it a Kickstarter-Project to pay the coders and hosting for the first year, so that money won’t be an issue regarding the possible sales.

    And all those cartoonists who put their strips on their websites for free (thanks guys!) could a make a few bucks. Everybody wins!

    What do you think?

  17. Hey Brian,
    Sorry about the multiple comments! When I tried posting it originally I got an error message and no indication that it had been sent anywhere!

  18. Foolkiller is an ugly comic book, and definitely worth reading. Gerber wrote about a man turned into a mass murderer due to modern life, and took the time and care to make him sympathetic and believable. The was pedestrian, as a previous commenter noted, but not actively bad.

    As for work-for-hire, I don’t think it’s inherently bad, as long as the people doing the work are compensated fairly. Unfortunately, that hasn’t been the case in comics. It’s appalling that Kirby, Finger, Gerber, etc. and their families made so little off of their creations.

  19. I’m not at all on board with you both politically, but it’s worth saying that Elite Squad: Now The Enemy Is Another, Secrets Of The Tribe, and Bus 174 all undermine your points about Padilha’s work. He’s far more thoughtful and slightly less conservative than you believe him to be.

  20. Actually, Foolkiller was not done by “Multiple artists”, J.J. Birch did layouts for all ten issues, and the first five were finished my Tony DeZuniga, the last five by Vincent Giarrano.

    It’s one of the best comics I’ve ever read. Gerber himself was extremely proud of it, and it’s a genuinely upsetting read. Gerber pushed further than he ever had, before or since, into the head of someone whose mind was unraveling and being pushed to do horrific things. And Gerber doesn’t condescend to the readers or keep them at arm’s length, either; Kurt Gephardt is a painfully identifiable antihero.

    (oh, and that jackass that showed up in Deadpool recently is actually the second Foolkiller, not Gephardt. Someone at Marvel couldn’t use google properly in the first New Avengers arc)

  21. Does this photo prove that Jeff is actually a time displaced Stan Lee from the ’50s: http://themarvelageofcomics.tumblr.com/post/22307260771/heres-a-photo-of-stan-lee-in-the-marvel-then

  22. “The same for The Clash, in a way. You really have to be British to get them.”

    Oh, that is so not true! The appeal of the Clash has way less to do with Britain than it has to do with being a punk band that actually gave a shit – compare the Sex Pistols, whose persona was based entirely around a kind of posed nihilism, or even the Ramones, who were really all about the fun of fucking around. The Clash were loud and fast and angry, but they were loud and fast and angry about actual specific things that mattered, and not just “I’m gonna yell now ’cause I’m young and I guess that’s what I’m supposed to do.”

  23. @Ian Brill: HOLY. SHIT. Add a pair of glasses on there and it IS Jeff. I can’t tell if that’s really good or really bad news for Mr. Lester’s future.

  24. Perhaps Jeff is the anti-Stan, then, since he’s extricating himself from Marvel entirely out of respect for how Kirby was screwed. ;) Or maybe that makes him the “Spock with a beard” version of Mr. Lee?

  25. @Matthew Murray: Essential Black Panther is coming out soon collecting Jungle Action #6-22 and #24, and Black Panther #1-10 (is that a strange cut off point?)

    It is kinda sorta a weird cut-off… Kirby did BLACK PANTHER #1-12. His last two issues were the start of a new storyline (about the villain Kiber the Cruel) — but the third concluding part abruptly switches writer (Ed Hannigan) & artist (???), and radically switches tone. (The two color Jack Kirby’s Black Panther volumes reprint #1-6 and #7-13.)

    But then, the book switched creative teams and tone in the shift from JUNGLE ACTION to BLACK PANTHER — writer Don MacGregor’s “Panther vs. the Klan” arc was infamously cut short by Kirby’s return to the character, a point the new team attempted to address in the final issues (#14 and 15) of BLACK PANTHER, carrying over into a handful of issues of MARVEL PREMIERE.

    Though I’ve had the color reprints of Kirby’s BLACK PANTHER for a while, I’ve been drooling over the Masterworks edition of the Jungle Action stories but couldn’t justify the price. Happy to see the Essential on its way, though I wonder if this material, more than most, will suffer from the lack of color.

  26. MacGregor was fired off of Jungle Action mid-story, then the Kirby series started a few years later. Kirby left the book mid-storyline, then the last few issues were by Hannigan (first issue plotted by Jim Shooter) and Jerry Bingham, the story continuing in Marvel Premiere, which I THINK tried to resolve the MacGregor story.

  27. @Dan, Steve and Matt Murray: I lived through these times, so I can tell you–Steve D has it exactly right. McGregor got the boot from Jungle Action so Kirby could do Black Panther the series which was so atonally different from what McGregor and Graham were doing, it was painful.

    I did appreciate the new team (Ed Hannigan and…Jerry Bingham, I wanna say? with inking at a few points by Bob McLeod?) trying to wrap up McGregor’s original storyline later and it’s kind of a bummer they weren’t included in this Essential Black Panther.

    Although I think the color is incredibly helpful to the work, I highly recommend grabbing a copy of this since it’ll be dirt cheap. I *adore* McGregor’s run and think Kirby’s stuff is both fun and kind of a nice meta-kick in the slats at fanboy/collector culture.

  28. @Ian and Graeme: Yeah, that’s….kind of unnerving, I admit. Interestingly, Stan was only 32 in that photo, 13 years younger than I am now so….if I was going to go the toupee route, there might be some hope for me seeming as youthful as Stan managed to be in later life. (fingers crossed)

  29. FOOLKILLER is indeed an interesting book. I remember when I first went on-line circa 1993 Steve Gerber was among the first pros I interacted with, and the series came up as something he recommended among his more overlooked work. So a while later, when I saw a set for sale, I picked it up. A lot of interesting things, Birch’s art wasn’t anything special for the most part, but it got the job done (with a few storytelling lapses). The biggest problem is that it’s not really a 10-issue story, so it’s a bit slow to get started, and lags a bit in the middle, you can see how it would make a tighter 6-issue job. Just pulled it out and re-read it, and it holds up, and I like the art a bit more than I remembered, especially the DeZuniga inked half.

  30. Regarding Graeme’s comment to pick up Dinosaurs vs. Aliens becauses “its free, why the hell not?”. I picked it up, and while it is an 8 page preview with 27 pages of filler, that preview looked sorta interesting.

  31. I was disappointed at your lack of mentions of Atomic Robo in your FCBD recommendations. Since you are off Marvel now, you should really look into Atomic Robo if you haven’t already. It is consistently very fun and witty. The fcbd issues have always been a blast as well. You can check out all of the previous fcbd issues on the creator’s website: http://www.nuklearpower.com/2008/07/18/free-comic-book-day-2008/

  32. Oops, I guess the change in inkers threw me off. I stand corrected re Foolkiller. And yes, the art isn’t bad, just not very dynamic, as was the case for most Marvel comics during the Shooter tenure.

  33. On a slight tangent, across media… I watched Submarine last night and though I grew up in quite a different environment, physically (inland L.A. was blasted with sun, not walkable), it certainly did ring some personal bells. And was great as a piece of creative work altogether. Thanks, Graeme!

    And yeah, The Clash did resonate in SoCal — but we had our own punk movement, that ranged from the silly to the politically active. Oi oi oi!

  34. From The Hill-“In a Bloomberg National Poll of likely voters, 53 percent said conservative radio host Limbaugh should be fired for calling Sandra Fluke a “slut” and a “prostitute” on air earlier this month.”

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