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New Tilting is, in fact, up (it is #216)

Hey, for once I’m actually awake/at the computer late enough on a Thursday night to actually see my name in lights, at the very top of CBR. Click that shit, and read some thoughts about DC’s reboot, a year into it. Comment here if you, y’know, won’t do the CBR thing (I get it, I get it!)

 

-B

12 Responses to “ New Tilting is, in fact, up (it is #216) ”

  1. If you think 52 DC titles are too many, What do you think of the 68 titles Marvel is soliciting for September, not counting Icon or Junior titles?

    Love the Tilting at Windmills posts BTW.

  2. “While there absolutely are customers who prefer the hardcover format, not having the collections of Batman “sync” up with the collections for (say) Catwoman is the right move.”

    I think there’s another “not” missing from this sentence, right before “the right move.”

    Other than that, excellent column. My experience mirrors your own quite a bit. The new and returning customers whose interest was grabbed by DC’s relaunch are enthusiastic about their comics, are willing to try new things, and likely to drop a book fast if it doesn’t click with them.

  3. Hey Brian,

    Rather than making poorly worded comments on the Beat, I thought I’d ask you directly….

    – At your store, how has the decrease of orders for non AvX Marvel comics affected overall sales? For example, are there a lot more people buying fewer comics than a year ago? Have former Marvel customers added more DC books?

    – How has the increasing success of the Walking Dead affected your overall sales? Like, do Walking Dead fans just buy Walking Dead, or do they add other comics?

    I’m sorry if these questions incorrectly assume the way superhero readers purchase their comics. I go into the store about once a month to pick up my pull list and buy almost exclusively Image and KaBoom fare, so I’m a bit of an outlier.

  4. @Brian Jacoby: ooooops. Yes, missing a “not”

    @Chris Hero: for us, at least, the Big Exodus of Marvel happened 6-8 months before the DC Reboot, and we’re much more in “mop-up” mode than many stores? (As a general rule, CE tends to be 6-12 months “ahead” of industry trends)

    TWD TV-driven people pretty much just buy TWD, though that’s jusssst starting changing; TWD comics people buy comics, generally.

    I’d say it is generally foolish to think of “superhero readers” as a separate class. In my experience (ugh)”superhero readers” also buy “non superhero stuff”, and virtually no one that is an “alternative comics reader” doesn’t buy at least a few super-books.

    -B

  5. @Brian

    Thanks for the straight forward answers! I appreciate it! It never occurred to me the Marvel Exodus didn’t happen at the same time as the New 52. And I’m sorry if I came off like I was insulting superhero readers. I just assumed, incorrectly it seems, there was a superhero reader niche like there’s a crime fiction niche or a romance niche (or science fiction niche) with people who read novels. Nothing wrong with having a penchant for a certain kind of genre in my book, I just don’t like the stores that only sell one genre.

    Anyway, great answers! Thank you so much!

  6. I agree 52 titles is way to many to expect readers to buy into. It made for great relaunch publicity, but if you divide it into the top 26 and the bottom 26, then yes you have their top properties that were front-loaded with top creators, which are doing smashingly well, and then the bottom 26 are bleeding readers and doing no better or worse than the bottom half of their line was doing a year ago. There’s already the post-“0” issue wave in place, but I think DC would be really smart on the next go round to put out a couple high profile originals and then fold in the Batman and Superman Beyonds and Smallvilles and Jonny DC all-ages titles with relaunches and really get the 52 down to 52 books. C’mon DC, let’s see that big publicity splash for New 52 Scooby Doo!

  7. I’m just at the beginning of your article and looking at the chart. Shouldn’t Legion of Super-Heroes be on there, too? And Flash? What do their numbers look like?

  8. I missed LSH because I’m stupid and blind (21k vs 19k, so down 10%)

    I didn’t include FLASH because there were no issues of FLASH in June, July or August of last year (it was FLASHPOINT instead, which is not a comparable datapoint)

    -B

  9. Thanks, Brian. I was curious how new 52 Flash compared to the previous version. I had completely forgotten about Flashpoint (which says something about that story, I suppose), but my guess without looking at any numbers would be that this version of the Flash is outselling the series that came before Flashpoint.
    Bummed to hear about Legion… if ever there was a book that I want to read more than anything it’s always going to be Legion. Here’s hoping that when Giffen comes on (bringing the Fatal Five with him) it gives the book a bump in the numbers.

  10. The “master list” of sales charts is here:

    http://www.icv2.com/articles/news/1850.html

    Another way to look stuff up, by title, would be going to the Beat, selecting “Sales charts”, and picking between Marvel, DC, and “indie” reports.

    -B

  11. The old Flash series had Johns writing it and Manapul on art (though the book was running pretty late and someone else was drawing it by the end). Plus it was supposed to lead in to Flashpoint. So the numbers were probably ok pre-Flashpoint.

    I would tend to agree that the numbers for the last few issues pre-Flashpoint may be off, because by that point everyone knew they were ending and creative teams were rushing to just come to some sort of conclusion. But DC had run a lot of their characters into the ground. JMS certainly “grounded” Superman and Wonder Woman; Robinson and Bagley were just not really doing well on JLA; Guggenheim brought some new ideas to JSA but it was floundering.

    But I really miss the smaller books that were killed: Bryan Q. Miller’s Batgirl, Jeff Lemire’s Superboy, J.T. Krul and Nicola Scott on Teen Titans (a book that had been floundering forever).

    I guess I’m the outlier that just gave up on DC after Flashpoint; I had been following a bunch of titles because I liked the characters, hoping in vain for a good creative team to really gel, and this was a perfect jumping off point. Which was probably a good thing, since nostalgia and momentum can only carry so far. I’m curious about some things post-new-52 and may indeed jump back onboard, but I can’t shake the feeling that they really needed an editorial shake-up more; it’s like they’ve made really bad editorial decisions since Countdown conflicted with Death of the New Gods and neither really fit in with Final Crisis. And yet, to my knowledge, this same editorial staff is the same one guiding the new 52.

  12. The old Flash series had Johns writing it and Manapul on art (though the book was running pretty late and someone else was drawing it by the end). Plus it was supposed to lead in to Flashpoint. So the numbers were probably ok pre-Flashpoint.

    I would tend to agree for the rest of the titles that the numbers for the last few issues pre-Flashpoint may be off, because by that point everyone knew they were ending and creative teams were rushing to just come to some sort of conclusion. But even before that DC had run a lot of their characters into the ground. JMS certainly “grounded” Superman and Wonder Woman; Robinson and Bagley were just not really doing well on JLA; Guggenheim brought some new ideas to JSA but it was floundering.

    But I really miss the smaller books that were killed: Bryan Q. Miller’s Batgirl, Jeff Lemire’s Superboy, J.T. Krul and Nicola Scott on Teen Titans (a book that had been floundering forever).

    I guess I’m the outlier that just gave up on DC after Flashpoint; I had been following a bunch of titles because I liked the characters, hoping in vain for a good creative team to really gel, and this was a perfect jumping off point. Which was probably a good thing, since nostalgia and momentum can only carry so far. I’m curious about some things post-new-52 and may indeed jump back onboard, but I can’t shake the feeling that they really needed an editorial shake-up more; it’s like they’ve made really bad editorial decisions since Countdown conflicted with Death of the New Gods and neither really fit in with Final Crisis. And yet, to my knowledge, this same editorial staff is the same one guiding the new 52.

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